Tag: Addressing

Frequently (Un)Asked Questions – Pt. 2

Frequently (Un)Asked Questions – Pt. 2

Recently, I was teaching a class, and a student asked what 10.0.0.0/255.0.0.0 meant in a firewall policy. I then spent time explaining the tenets of subnets and IP addressing. This wasn’t the first time I have had a student look confused or ask a question on the subject. Therefore, today’s blog will discuss the ideas of IP addresses and MAC addresses.

Scenario: You want to send a letter to your friend in your town. What information do you need? Their street address? Their city? Their state? Their zip code? For something local, you could probably put the street address of your friend, and the post office will get it there.

Continue reading “Frequently (Un)Asked Questions – Pt. 2”

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The Future of Network Addressing – IPv6

The Future of Network Addressing – IPv6

Last time, I talked about the need for IPv6. On this installment, I will explain what is included in IPv6 and how it solves the problems from IPv4. Let’s recap:

Internet Protocol version 4 came out in 1981. To identify hosts connected at layer three, IP addresses were used. IPv4’s addressing convention allows for a little over four billion addresses (what seemed like an un-reachable number). In 2011, the world ran out of IPv4 addresses (despite efforts to stall the issue). As such a new version of Internet Protocol was created – IPv6 (further reading: yes, I know it should be IPv5).

How does IPv6 solve this addressing problem? Continue reading “The Future of Network Addressing – IPv6”